Working at Bayer

Working in Switzerland

Entering & Leaving Switzerland

Nationals of EU/EFTA countries are subject to different rules from citizens of non-member countries when entering Switzerland. Responsibility lies with the State Secretary for Migration.

For relevant details, please see:

https://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/entry-switzerland-residence/information-entry-switzerland-residence.html

Note on external links: Bayer bears no responsibility for the content of external links. Responsibility for the content of linked pages lies exclusively with the respective website operator.

Permits & Visas

All non-Swiss nationals must hold a valid passport and a work and/or residence permit to live and/or work in Switzerland. The various types of permit are as follows:

  • G permits (cross-border commuter permits) are issued to people working in Switzerland but living in neighboring countries.
  • L permits (short-term residence permits) are issued for short-term working assignments of up to one year.
  • B permits (residence permits) are issued to holders of a Swiss contract of employment running for 12 months or more. They are valid for 5 years.
  • C permits (permits for settled foreign nationals) can be applied for after 5 years of regular and uninterrupted residence in Switzerland. They are valid for an unlimited period and afford holders more rights than B permits. Some nationalities are only permitted to apply for a C permit after 10 years’ residence in Switzerland.

Success in obtaining a work permit in Switzerland depends on various factors, though, such as country of origin, qualifications, skills and fixed quotas.

The website of the relevant cantonal AWA (Office for Economy and Labor) provides further details.

Nationals of EU-17/EFTA countries no longer need to apply for a work permit. It is granted automatically once a contract of employment is submitted to the authorities.

Further information can be found at:

Note on external links: Bayer bears no responsibility for the content of external links. Responsibility for the content of linked pages lies exclusively with the respective website operator.

Tax System

The Federal government and the 26 cantons each have their own tax legislation. The taxes collected at Federal, cantonal and communal level differ in some cases.

It is advisable to obtain information from the official tax website of the relevant canton or commune before or after moving to Switzerland. A general overview of the Swiss tax system is provided at www.estv.admin.ch.

Note on external links: Bayer bears no responsibility for the content of external links. Responsibility for the content of linked pages lies exclusively with the respective website operator.

Social Security

Switzerland has a comprehensive network of social security institutions to provide the people living and working in the country and their families with extensive protection against risks with financial consequences that they are unable to handle alone.

The Swiss social security system is split into five parts:

  1. Swiss pension provision: Old-age/survivors’ insurance (AHV) and invalidity insurance (IV), based on the three-pillar principle. AHV and IV in conjunction with supplementary benefits (for when pensions and income do not cover minimum living costs) make up the 1st pillar. This is intended to cover basic needs and is mandatory. The occupational pension (pension fund), which is also mandatory, constitutes the 2nd pillar. The 3rd pillar is the voluntary private pension.
  2. Protection against the consequences of illness/an accident
  3. Compensation for loss of earnings during military/alternative civilian service or maternity leave
  4. Unemployment insurance
  5. Family allowances

The various types of insurance provide protection by making payments such as pensions, compensation for loss of earnings and family allowances, and by covering costs in the event of illness or an accident.

The payments made by the individual social security branches are primarily financed by contributions based on income from gainful employment. The Federal government and the cantons participate to differing extents in financing social security (AHV/IV). They may finance it in its entirety (supplementary benefits, EL) or help people in need pay their premiums (reduced health insurance premium).

Health Insurance

Basic health insurance is mandatory for everyone living and working in Switzerland. Insurance must be organized with an approved health insurance company within three months of arrival in the country, including for any family members also living in Switzerland. Any approved insurance company can be selected.

A good comparison website for health insurance companies is https://en.comparis.ch/.

Note on external links: Bayer bears no responsibility for the content of external links. Responsibility for the content of linked pages lies exclusively with the respective website operator.

Pension Insurance / Pension Fund

Membership of a pension fund is mandatory for all Swiss employees below retirement age – 64 for women and 65 for men. All Swiss employers have a pension plan that employees must join. Only in exceptional cases can contributions continue to be paid in a person’s home country, which then exempts them from making payments in Switzerland. If this foreign plan is recognized by Swiss authorities, pension contributions are tax deductible.